Manchester City are one of the richest clubs in world football ever since their takeover 2008. They have won six domestic honours since then, largely down to the arrival of their superstar players such as Yaya Toure, David Silva and Sergio Agüero. With the money spent in previous seasons the 2012 and 2014 Premier League champions aren’t short of top players, but did they perhaps sell some players too soon?

Jérôme Boateng

The German was signed by Roberto Mancini in 2010 after an impressive World Cup display with Germany in South Africa. Many predicted the German to be one for the future, catching the eye with his strength, pace, reading of the game and ability on the ball. It would have been ideal back then for Boateng to have played alongside Vincent Kompany and, it even leaves City fans questioning what could have been, especially with their defensive woe’s in recent years. Boateng featured in as little as 19 games for City, playing only 16 in the Premier League and featuring in three cup games, which led to an FA Cup win despite not being in the match day squad. Boateng was constantly switched with Micah Richards in the right back position, and the German expressed his desire to leave The Etihad for Bayern Munich to play as a centre back and become a regular for the national team, which he has successfully accomplished in Bavaria. Since his move to Bayern, Boateng has been transformed into one of the finest ball-playing centre backs in modern day football under the help of current City boss Pep Guardiola, and has gone on to win the Champions League, The World Cup, four Bundesliga titles, three German cups, two German Supercups, one UEFA Supercup and one Club World Championship. Last year he won the footballer of the year in Germany, showing how far he has come since his days at City! One can only imagine what the partnership of Kompany and Boateng would be like at The Etihad!

Boateng has become one of the finest ball playing centre backs in world football!

Elano Blumer

One of the fans favourites at the Etihad, Elano impressed with his stellar disaplys between 2007-2009, and was arguably City’s best player for that period of time. He formed a formidable partnership with Stephen Ireland in the central midfield and on his debut against West Ham United created the opening goal of the season for Rolando Bianchi, and just weeks later provided another assist for Geovanni in the 1-0 derby win. Elano was lauded for his passing range, his dribbling and his overall play, but it was his free kicks that caught the eye! In the space of eight days, Elano scored two outrageous free kicks against Middlesborough and his most famous strike against Newcastle. He was part of a City midfield which consisted of himself, Martin Petrov, Stephen Ireland and Deiberson Geovanni which helped City to a ninth placed finish, only three points off the Europa League places, although they entered into the competition due to the fair play rule. Elano ended his first season as City’s top scorer with ten goals. In his second season there was the take over, which brought a new manager and new players. Current players Vincent Kompany and Pablo Zabaleta were brought in as well as Shaun Wright-Phillips, and the then British transfer record signing Robinho, who had a good friendship with Elano during his time at City. Under new manager Mark Hughes, Elano managed to break back into the Brazil squad, but for City he was limited to only 28 league appearances due to injury, and the following season was sold by City and replaced by Gareth Barry. Arguably City missed his goals and creativity from midfield, which saw them miss out on a Champions League place that season! Elano could have arguably played for City for another two seasons.

Elano was a fan favourite during his time in Manchester

Edin Džeko

When rumours were circulating over Carlos Tevez’s future in Manchester in 2o11, Roberto Mancini signed Džeko from Wolfsburg for £27 million, and it proved to be one of City’s most important signings. At 6 foot 4 inches, and known by the Bosnian fans as the Bosnian Diamond, Džeko had a very impressive record in Germany, winning the title in 2009 scoring 26 goals in 32 games, and in the following season scored 22 goals in 34 games. Before he joined City in the January transfer window of 2011, he had already scored 10 goals in 17 games. When he moved to England he had a tough time to start with, scoring only twice in 15 league appearances. The following season however, with the arrival of Sergio Agüero and Carlos Tevez absent without leave, Džeko was the main srike partner for Agüero, and he scored 14 goals in 30 league appearances, including the second goal in the famous 3-2 win against QPR. The following season it looked as if Džeko would struggle to start, with Agüero, the returning Carlos Tevez and after an impressive Euro 2012 campaign Mario Balotelli. However the Bosnian was a key player for City despite their failed title defence, scoring 14 goals in 32 league appearances, with late winners against West Brom, Fulham and Tottenham to help City secure second place, and also scored the opening goal in City’s loss at the Bernabeu. However it was the season after when Džeko came into his stride, scoring 16 league goals in 31 appearances. The first half of the season he was benched by Agüero and Alvaro Negredo, but due to injuries to both, Džeko was the main man and he provided the goods for City. H e was pivotal in every game for the blues, leading them two a second title in three years. In his final season 2014/15, Džeko suffered with several injuries, and Agüero’s Golden Boot winning form left Džeko on the bench, and he was subsequently sold the season after to Roma. With Wilfried Bony failing to live up to expectation, City definitely missed Džeko’s impact, a player for the big occasion and a goal poacher, City would surely have done better last season with Džeko as backup to Sergio Agüero!

Edin Džeko scored a total of 50 league goals in 130 league appearances.

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This article was written by Ben Tipper. Twitter – @bentippermcfc

Featured image credit: Cléria De Souza

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